Bay Area Tech Conferences

Why was yesterday’s conference so good, for me? Well, it’s the first time I’ve been to a conference in this format, where companies do short presentations and then take questions and criticism from a panel and from the audience. Obviously a lot depends on how good the questions are, and they were spotty at this show. Sometimes the panelists knew the topic, and other times, not at all. But the format is useful and potentially lively, which helps you stay awake even when the networking is insufficient.

Every conference has to make-due with inadequate technology, one would think that a conference at Microsoft might be exempt, not so. The port issue was a deal-stopper for me and others, and there was no webcast. These are not small issues for the conference promoter, beacuse a conference that has a live presence on the web has exponentially more impact that one with almost no presence, like yesterday’s conference.

It seems we need a dedicated venue in the Bay Area, a permanent space that’s designed for tech conferences. Every conference emanating from Silicon Valley or its environs should have state of the art networking. For that to happen we have to define what that is, and the only way to define it is by doing it.

5 responses to this post.

  1. I’ve always wondered why there were not more true web conferences. Seems to me that a web conference could be run with almost 0 cost, for the host, for the contributors, and for the audience. I’ve been to a few, for example Pat Price’s Web conference Rooms which was primarily for the visually impaired. I mean video-to-video and voice-to-voice is not as good as face-to-face; but all too frequently $0 is possible, but $1200 is impossible. How come this media has not taken off?

    Reply

  2. I’ve always wondered why there were not more true web conferences. Seems to me that a web conference could be run with almost 0 cost, for the host, for the contributors, and for the audience. I’ve participated in a few, for example Pat Price’s Web conference Rooms which was primarily for the visually impaired. I mean video-to-video and voice-to-voice is not as good as face-to-face; but all too frequently $0 is possible, but $1200 is impossible. How come this media has not taken off?

    Reply

  3. Some might say it has taken off. LiveMeeting (formerly Placeware) and Web-X are pretty big businesses.

    Reply

  4. Posted by wagi on March 3, 2006 at 4:47 pm

    I think people are afraid to use tech.

    Reply

  5. Posted by Jake on March 4, 2006 at 7:59 am

    Part of the conference experience is being there and not here where you still have the perceived responsibilities that come with being here.

    Reply

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