Getting my data out of Flickr?

I was at lunch today with Mike Arrington and a question came up — how do I get my data out of Flickr? I found out the other day that my RSS feed only has the ten most recent pictures in it. So how do I get the rest of the pictures out?

21 responses to this post.

  1. Drop them an email. I’ve had a couple of problems with my Flickr account and I got really good tech support via email. I’m surprised they don’t have a “backlog” feed.

    I also found this: http://sunkencity.org/flickrbackup/
    It’s Java based, so it should work on Mac and Windows.

    Reply

  2. this bit in their API shoud get you what you need (at least I don’t think there’s limitation to the amount you can get back)

    http://www.flickr.com/services/api/flickr.people.getPublicPhotos.html

    then you could use a different part of the api (fro mthe getPublicPhotos response)
    eg: http://www.flickr.com/services/api/flickr.photos.getSizes.html

    to get the format of the photo you want.

    it shouldn’t be too tricky for some who understands the api to write a scrpt in their language of choice to get the data you request
    ;) – I wouldn’t be at all suprised if there were already scripts to do this. – it just depends what script language you like

    Reply

  3. Ummm…we need an API or a full feed, not an email address.

    Reply

  4. Try their API. Its straight forward and the last time I checked, if should give you access to all of your data.

    Reply

  5. Hmm… More specifically, check the details for the following APIs:

    http://www.flickr.com/services/api/flickr.people.getInfo.html – Use this on yourself and you’ll get the date of the first photo.

    http://www.flickr.com/services/api/flickr.photos.search.html – Use this to search for all of YOUR photos starting from the date you got from the getInfo function.

    http://www.flickr.com/services/api/flickr.photos.getInfo.html – Use this to retrieve information per each photo, from which you can build the URL to download it.

    Reply

  6. Hmm… More specifically, check the details for the following APIs:

    http://www.flickr.com/services/api/flickr.people.getInfo.html – Use this on yourself and you’ll get the date of the first photo.

    http://www.flickr.com/services/api/flickr.photos.search.html – Use this to search for all of YOUR photos starting from the date you got from the getInfo function.

    http://www.flickr.com/services/api/flickr.photos.getInfo.html – Use this to retrieve information per each photo, from which you can build the URL to download it.

    Reply

  7. here’s the first page of your photos (of 4 – 500 per page)

    http://www.flickr.com/services/rest/?method=flickr.people.getPublicPhotos&api_key=b7bdb51530297d37c46aedb778c289c4&user_id=22221172%40N00&per_page=500

    with this you need to take the photo->id attribute and run that result against the flickr.photo.getSizes function to get url you need.

    voila! api goodness.

    Reply

  8. just add &page=1 2, 5 or 4 to that usl and you;ll get the other pages.

    btw: this is using their ‘demo’ api key, so if it doesn’t work, that might be why and you’ll need your own api key.

    fyi: your user id is: 22221172%40N00

    saving you the hassle of finding that out via flickr.people.findByUsername
    ;)

    Reply

  9. err…1,2,3 or 4 , even ;) – to that url

    Reply

  10. And finally… using the data from the big url above, you vould just run the ‘photo’ attributes for ‘id’, ‘secret’ and ‘server’ at create:

    http://static.flickr.com/#SERVER#/#ID#_#SECRET#_o.jpg

    thus : your Macword badge… ( ‘o’ denotes the original image )

    http://static.flickr.com/43/86457039_1297b8e993_o.jpg

    To get other sizes, simply change ‘o’ at the end after the underscore to:

    s = small square 75×75
    t = thumbnail, 100 on longest side
    m = small, 240 on longest side
    [none] medium, 500 on longest side
    b = large, 1024 on longest side (only exists for very large original images that were resized during upload)

    o = original image, either a jpg, gif or png, depending on source format

    there ya go

    Reply

  11. “Ummm…we need an API or a full feed, not an email address.”

    Um…..you could e-mail them and ask them about the API.

    Reply

  12. [...] Is this thing still on? I just saw Dave post an mp3 enclosure to his WordPress blog. Now, he could have done that via the WordPress interface I think, but surely, not our Dave. His he got a new trick up his sleeve for the OPML Editor WordPress tool? Hmmmm.. we shall see. [...]

    Reply

  13. [...] Hmmm.. something fishy is going on here. [...]

    Reply

  14. [...] Hmmm.. something fishy is going on here. It’s gone from the post, but still remains in the feed [...]

    Reply

  15. I thought there was already an api in place?

    Reply

  16. Flickr launched with a full and complete API, documented here: http://www.flickr.com/services/api/ (if you want to get a feel for how it works, chose a method and then try the “api explorer”). There are hundreds of applications built on it.

    There are a number of utilities built on the API for downloading all your photos and metadata, and we’ll eventually offer one ourselves (right now you can order DVD backups through a partner, but not a complete download).

    Given that some accounts have 10s or even 100s of thousands of records associated with them (photos, tags, notes, comments, contacts, etc.) a “full feed” isn’t really feasible (and wouldn’t capture all the data anyway).

    There’s no need to write to us to ask about the API: the documentation and mailing list archives are all public and non-commercial keys can be obtained instantly. There are also a number of Flickr groups devoted to hacks and the API.

    Reply

  17. [...] For example, Dave Winer had a post – Getting my data out of flickr? and there you have a dozen of comments! OBVIOUSLY a google search would have given him the answer if he did a 2 minute search. But he knows – a one sec post will give him better answer. Lets the blogosphere do the work for him! very cheesy I would say … but guess what at the end of the day its collective knowledge. its a win-win situation. I get to know more blogs, the person who commented gets more hits and gets into the blogosphere. Sometimes, I should admit – i write comments just to get noticed. [...]

    Reply

  18. Posted by Dave on February 7, 2006 at 2:08 pm

    This is one of those posts that leaves my head shaking. I’m glad Stewart chimed in about Flickr’s API, but why did he even have to? This is something that you could have easily figured out yourself by just typing the words “Flickr API” into Google (first hit, no less!). Sometimes, I wonder how it could *possibly* be easier for you to craft entire posts about things like this than it is for you to just do the handfull of Google searches it would take to find the answer out on your own. (It was the same with your BitTorrent post a while back, asking another question that could have been answered with a single Google search.)

    Reply

  19. Dave,

    I am slightly confused, what are you saying in the last comment??

    What I meant was – its easier for your to let the thoughts out into the blogosphere and wait the proper instructions to come!

    Reply

  20. [...] What is Attention and Attention Data? (2:45) The Attention Market (9:20) Communicating Attention (12:00) Attention data recording and feedback – Eric Horvitz – Model of Attention and Marc Smith – AURA: The Advance User Resource Annotation System (14:00) The ROI on Attention Data (16:20) Defining the Attention Problem (17:30) Infinite information and finite time (18:30) RSS the Attention enabler (22:50) Monetizing Attention data (27:10) The cycle of RSS consumption Attention for the masses and the edge cases (35:00) Attention value exchange and Root Markets – (38:40) Being marketed information (43:00) Getting my data in and out 46:11 On Gestures, Gesture streams and GestureBank (47:50) Summing up (53:00) End (58:19) [...]

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 60 other followers

%d bloggers like this: